Theodore Tihansky oil painting of School House on Monhegan Island

This painting by Theodore Tihansky, of the school house on Monhegan Island, came in with a fungal invasion on the reverse, and dirt particulates across the paint film.

A trio of cleaning agents were used to address the fungal invasions. Further protection was given by the Dutch Method that straightened the canvas and, on the reverse, added a layer of gesso. Careful cleaning was conducted on the front.

The Monhegan Island School is a treasured landmark and is still in use today. According to their website their “integrated classroom offers students pre-kindergarten through eighth grade an amazing opportunity to learn in a supportive multi-age setting and is enhanced by a tight-knit community of educators, artists, artisans, writers, poets, photographers, lobstermen, woodworkers, gardeners, business owners and more!

“Our remote location and beautiful seascape allows us to take a holistic approach to our teaching. Our classroom learning extends beyond our one room ~ our students enjoy 12 miles of hiking trails, a skating pond, lush forests, rocky shorelines, beaches, a shipwreck, historic homes, tidal pools, community gardens, lobstering, a museum, a library and more ~ all explored on foot!

Monhegan provides a rich, hands on learning environment for the arts and sciences and plenty of active, outdoor time to supplement our classroom studies.”

Theodore Tihansky (21st Century) received his formal art training at the Art Students League in New York City, Paier College of Art, and Lyme Academy of Fine Art in Connecticut. In 1991, he was awarded the John Stobart Landscape Fellowship with the concurrent opportunity to show at the Lyme Academy Fine Art Gallery.
Four years later in November, he opened the Theodore Tihansky Fine Art and Performance Gallery on Franklin Street in Newport, Rhode Island. At that time, he received wide recognition for his “Collaboration of the Arts” production.  Returning to Maine, Tihansky spent his first winter as a stern man on a lobster boat. In his free time, he was painting the harsh and splendid scenes of the island.

In his words, “The paintings are the end products; what is important to me is the moment, the experience that I have because of my painting. The people I meet and the things I do are the reason.”

 

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