Steinberg Macatawa Watercolor

This watercolor of Lake Macatawa was attached to hard board which contains acid components. Over time these acids migrate to the work itself and cause color discoloration. A bath with specific chemicals allows the work to be delicately lifted from the board. Then treatment for the acids can begin.

The artist, Nathaniel Steinberg (1893 – 1976), was born in Jerusalem, Palestine. He studied at the Art Institute of Chicago with Welling Reynolds and George Bellows, and would become an active painter, illustrator and etcher in Chicago. He was a member of the Palette and Chisel Academy, and was the president from 1960 to 1961. He kept a studio in Douglas, Michigan.

4 responses

  1. Beautiful watercolor and subject matter. It looks to me like the artist painted from the dock between shore and out to the office and inside boat slips which were built over the water at Jesiek Brother’s Shipyard. This is looking east towards Jenison Park with the onshore Jesiek boat sheds and workshops on the right. Correct me if I’m wrong but I spent my early days here roaming the boatsheds and boat slips. This looks like 1930’s+-. Was there any date on the artwork? Another beautiful restoration by Miller Fenwood as well as preserving local West Michigan history.

    • There was no date on the watercolor but we believe from materials and historical material from The Women’s Club of Saugatuck that you are correct in placing this in the 1930’s.

  2. Pingback: The Commercial Record Article | Miller Fenwood

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